Greta Rybus photographer

Athlete Kate Hall for Runner's World

Can an Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Make the Olympic Track Team?

Kate Hall, a jumper and sprinter, wants to be the first American to do so. She’ll get there her way.

“My work ethic stems from being diagnosed [with Type 1 Diabetes] when I was 10,” Kate Hall says. “I’ve had to manage and control this disease from a very young age, and I wanted to do it all on my own.”

Read the full story about Kate Hall, written by Scott Douglas, here.

All images © Greta Rybus for Runner’s World.

Bon Appetit's Andrew Knowlton and Family Explore Maine, Photographed for Maine Office of Tourism

This summer, I got to explore Midcoast Maine with Andrew Knowlton, Restaurant Editor at Bon Appétit magazine and host of Netflix’s The Final Table, and his family for Maine Office of Tourism and Visit Maine’s the Maine Quarterly. Along with his daughters Julep and Signe, and wife Christina, Andrew visited some of his favorite spots along Maine’s coast.

“It starts a few weeks out from Memorial Day and lasts through Labor Day. Maine Recommendation Season is an annual phenomenon in the Knowlton house, as friends (and friends of friends) plot out their perfect getaways to the Pine Tree State. The texts, emails and DMs start rolling in the moment the weather turns: “Hey, hope you’re well! Going up to Maine in a few weeks. I know you love it up there. What should we make sure to hit?” It’s as much a ritual as baseball’s opening day—and something I take just as seriously.”

See Andrew Knowlton’s Maine recommendations here. And his profile of Portland, Maine as Restaurant City of the Year here.

All images © Greta Rybus for Visit Maine

New Commercial Work: Thoughtful, Creative Imagery for Needed

011519_FINAL_Needed_EditedTable_Buckley-SMALL.jpg

When the brilliant art director, Lake Buckley, came to me with a new and innovative concept, I knew I wanted to be on board. With the thoughtful stylist Molly O’Rourke, we worked with a stellar team to create a highly technical and deeply thoughtful set of images for Needed, a new nourishment and nutritional company, to roll out on their instagram. Square by square, we built a table for everyone. Each square symbolized and discussed a different topic regarding holistic nutrition: science and data, gender inequality, vitamins, omegas, prenatal care, etc.

See the entire project on instagram: @nourishmentisneeded

Needed: www.thisisneeded.com
Art Director- Lake Buckley: www.lakebuckley.com
Stylist- Molly O’Rourke www.oneandsupp.com

The New Makers: New England Artists Photographed for Yankee Magazine

“Their skills are as old as New England itself; their materials, timeless. But there’s a modern gleam that run through the work of the 10 artisans in these pages, each pushing the bounds of what’s expected while still keeping that essential connection: hand to hand, theirs to ours.”

Ten New England artist photographed for Yankee Magazine: Forrest Stone, Addie Peet, James and Zoe Zillian, John Welch, Jeremy Frey, Tanya Monique Crane, Linny Kenney, Ruben Marroquin, Moriah Cowles, and Melinda Cox. Written by Annie Graves.

All images © Greta Rybus for Yankee Magazine

Bill Mackowski, one of the last snowshoe makers, for Another Escape

“I’ve been a woodsman my entire life. I’ve hunted and trapped and spent time out in the woods since I was a kid. In the winter, we always had to use snowshoes and pack baskets, and as I got older I took an interest in making my own. I originally started making snowshoes when I was in my late thirties, when I was kind of going through a midlife crisis.There was an old fella here in Maine called Dick McCubrey who made snowshoes – one of the last guys left – and I asked him to make me a pair. He said, “Listen, why don’t I teach you how to make your own?” I said, “Gee, that sounds like a great idea”. From him, I learnt the basics for a pretty standard working snowshoe, and that’s where it all started. 

People tend to overlook the importance of snowshoes for the spread of civilization. They often don’t realize the incredible history and impact snowshoes have had. They go way back to the original expansion of civilization; for so long, travel was restricted to canoes, but the snowshoe opened up areas that were otherwise totally inaccessible. “

Bill Mackowski is considered to be among the last snowshoe makers. He makes snowshoes and pack baskets by hand in his workshop on his farm in Milford, Maine- where he also houses a collection of over 200 snowshoes from around the world in every size, shape, and tradition. Photographed for Another Escape.

All images © Greta Rybus for Another Escape

Revisiting Japan, an old home

I’m thinking about Japan this week: craving miso, kombu, persimmon. I grew up in Idaho, and consider it my home, but spent two of my teenage years in Northern Japan. So, Japan is my home, too. Just like Maine is my home; and Montana, where I went to college. The prefecture where my family spent those years is be the home of Aomori, the sister city of my now-home in Maine. They have similar climates and geography: rocky coastlines, thick forests, economies shaped by fishing, and long winters. It’s where I first started practicing photography in a dedicated way, the first time I learned to love a new home, the first time I saw winter surfers. I haven’t been back to Aomori since leaving in 2003, but last December I was able to revisit Southern Japan with chef/artist/guide Kaia Sisu Harper to document Japan’s plant-based food systems.

During our time together , we met Ten, a Buddhist monk, photographed at Nanzen-ji Temple in Kyoto. A year later, he is now the head priest of the Ensho-Ji Temple in Tokyo. Last December, Ten showed me and a small group of other travelers around Nanzen-ji, taking us to hidden rooms with gold painted ceilings and quiet halls that smelled like incense. He introduced us to the concept of “goen,” a word that is close to the English word "fate" or "connected-ness," used when some random occurrence(s) seem to have happened by reason, or was meant to happen. With the help of Toshi Iwaki, I asked Ten if he had any messages he’d like me to know about or share. He wrote, “"声無き想いを伝える、受ける。この縁に毎度感無量です.” Not easily translated, the text breaks down as:

声無き = [adj.] voiceless, soundless
想い = [n.] thoughts, ideas, intentions 
伝える = [v.] to tell, to transmit
受ける = [v.] to receive
この = [adj.] this
縁 = [n.] goen; connection, fate
毎度 = [adj.] every time
感無量 = [adj.] fulfilled, deeply moved
です = [v.] to be

Not easily simplified, the phrase can mean:
(1) Having the opportunity to communicate thoughts without voice; it is my source of fulfillment. (2) Every opportunity to exchange thoughts without talking; it is what fulfills me.
(3) Communicating voiceless thoughts.  These opportunities are my source of fulfillment. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Toshi, who was with us in the temple that day, and kind enough to help me translate, told me, “My interpretation of his words is that your thoughts (mind/intention) change into something else as soon as you put them into words (or, as soon as you speak). 

All images © Greta Rybus

The Home As Art: A Curator's Renovated Church for Remodelista

Donna McNeil is a woman wholly devoted to the arts: as an executive director, arts advocate, storyteller, and curator. Last year, she bought an 1851 church in Rockland, Maine; shaping the space with a curator’s mind and a vision based on art and community. She shares her home with one artist tenant: “My housemate is a young artist who is engaged in an ongoing project centered around the idea of the ancient faith-based idea of ‘radical hospitality,'” she says. “Every two weeks we—she, really—invite the entire community in for bread, soup, and cake.”

“As a person without family, I wanted to welcome in community,” she continued. “Working in the arts, it was natural that I would have creatives using the space as they envisioned. I’ve had a cello performance, a book reading, a sound installation, a sculpture exhibit, and dance.” 

Photographed for Remodelista, with interview and writing by Annie Quigley. Read the full article here.

High Ridge Farm Photographed for Remodelista

Katee Lafleur and Andrew White found an old farm property on Maine FarmLink, a division of Maine Farmland Trust, when they were living in Vermont and looking to make a move. “We felt like we were suddenly in on the secret that is the midcoast of Maine,” Lafleur says. As they set about tilling the land—they grow vegetables, herbs, and flowers, and raise chickens and woodland hogs—they also turned their attention to the 1835 farmhouse, drawing from instinct and learning as they went. “I was drawn to the simplicity and bare-bonedness,” Lafleur says. They took the walls down to the plaster, sourced extraordinary vintage finds from Craigslist and Goodwill, and added hides and bleached-white bones, relics of their butchered animals. The result: stripped-down and striking interiors that, like the farm, are a constant work in progress.

New work for High Ridge Farm for Remodelista. Caption adapted from writer and editor Annie Quigley's story, which you can read (with more images from the home and farm here). 

All images © Greta Rybus
 

Blending Culture and Community to Combat Addiction: the Penobscot Healing to Wellness Court

The Penobscot Healing to Wellness Court has many of the basic functions of state drug courts, which seek to foster recovery rather than punitive actions. Like most courts, the Healing to Wellness Court provides intensive case management and counseling, frequent drug testing, and a balance of sanctions and incentives. The tribe’s court is different; incorporating culture and tradition as a part of recovery. Each court session starts with a prayer and a smudging- burning sage and traditional medicines. Participants are expected to attend regular drumming circles, language classes, and cultural events and activities. And, perhaps most importantly, a central tenant of the program is to focus as much on community healing as on individual healing.

New assignment work for independent nonprofit journalism group Pine Tree Watch, published in the Bangor Daily News, story written by Chelsea Conaboy

All images © Greta Rybus
 

India Part Two: Bangalore to Mysore for Lodestars Anthology

This May, at the edge of India's hottest season, I traveled from Bangalore to Mysore for UK-based travel magazine Lodestars Anthology. With Kamalan Travels as my guide, I visited palaces and temples, sacred river banks and thriving silkworm farms. The area is more popular with local tourists than foreign visitors, with thousands of Indian visitors each day. 

Read more about Lodestar Anthology's India Issue here

All images © Greta Rybus

Climate Change and the Lobster Industry, photographed for the New York Times

"Since the early 1980s, climate change had warmed the Gulf of Maine’s cool waters to the ideal temperature for lobsters, which has helped grow Maine’s fishery fivefold to a half-billion-dollar industry, among the most valuable in the United States. But last year the state’s lobster landings dropped by 22 million pounds, to 111 million.

Now, scientists and some fishermen are worried that the waters might eventually warm too much for the lobsters, and are asking how much longer the boom can last.“Climate change really helped us for the last 20 years,” said Dave Cousens, who stepped down as president of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association in March. But, he added, “Climate change is going to kill us, in probably the next 30.”

Since 2015, my personal work has centered around investigating and documenting how climate change impacts people and communities. I was so pleased to have an assignment with the New York Times to photograph how climate change will shape the lobster industry, with excellent writing and reporting by Livia Allbeck-Ripka. 

Read the article in the New York Times here

All images © Greta Rybus for the New York Times