Maine photographer

Bon Appetit's Andrew Knowlton and Family Explore Maine, Photographed for Maine Office of Tourism

This summer, I got to explore Midcoast Maine with Andrew Knowlton, Restaurant Editor at Bon Appétit magazine and host of Netflix’s The Final Table, and his family for Maine Office of Tourism and Visit Maine’s the Maine Quarterly. Along with his daughters Julep and Signe, and wife Christina, Andrew visited some of his favorite spots along Maine’s coast.

“It starts a few weeks out from Memorial Day and lasts through Labor Day. Maine Recommendation Season is an annual phenomenon in the Knowlton house, as friends (and friends of friends) plot out their perfect getaways to the Pine Tree State. The texts, emails and DMs start rolling in the moment the weather turns: “Hey, hope you’re well! Going up to Maine in a few weeks. I know you love it up there. What should we make sure to hit?” It’s as much a ritual as baseball’s opening day—and something I take just as seriously.”

See Andrew Knowlton’s Maine recommendations here. And his profile of Portland, Maine as Restaurant City of the Year here.

All images © Greta Rybus for Visit Maine

New Commercial Work: Thoughtful, Creative Imagery for Needed

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When the brilliant art director, Lake Buckley, came to me with a new and innovative concept, I knew I wanted to be on board. With the thoughtful stylist Molly O’Rourke, we worked with a stellar team to create a highly technical and deeply thoughtful set of images for Needed, a new nourishment and nutritional company, to roll out on their instagram. Square by square, we built a table for everyone. Each square symbolized and discussed a different topic regarding holistic nutrition: science and data, gender inequality, vitamins, omegas, prenatal care, etc.

See the entire project on instagram: @nourishmentisneeded

Needed: www.thisisneeded.com
Art Director- Lake Buckley: www.lakebuckley.com
Stylist- Molly O’Rourke www.oneandsupp.com

Phid Lawless of Lunaform, Photographed for Alys Gazette

“I wanted to create pots that are reminiscent of vessels found in ancient Greek and Roman gardens. Those things have been around for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years!”

“It’s peaceful and beautiful, and not too far from the luxury of grocery stores, if you know what I mean. Some small towns around here don’t even have gas stations. Sullivan is a perfect place to work and live if you don’t mind a few feet of snow every now and then.”

Phid Lawless, of Lunaform, where he makes handcrafted vessels in Northern Maine. Photographed for the Alys Gazette

All images © Greta Rybus

New Feature Work for Outside Magazine: "What Happens When You Teach a Cowboy to Sail"

Or, alternate title: “Our Love is like a Ship on the Ocean”

New work for Outside Magazine, images to accompany the saga of a sailor-turned cowgirl and mountain man / cowboy out on the sea. Claire Antoszewski and Will Grant co-wrote the story of their adventure on the sea, and what it meant to weather the open water as a couple.

“Entering unfamiliar harbors can be dodgy; enter in the dark during a storm and it’s downright scary. But cold and tired, we beat doggedly toward Gloucester. We couldn’t see Norman’s Woe, the fabled site of many shipwrecks to the southwest of the harbor, but there was a faint blinking light warning us to steer clear. We could barely make out the lobster pots until we were almost on top of them. There were hundreds, their malevolent little lines ready to wrap around any propeller that came too close. Our new spotlight didn’t work. We rounded the break wall and picked up the first mooring we came across. I tried to hail the yacht club it belonged to on the radio, but there was no answer. Closed for winter. We cooked two boxes of macaroni and cheese, devoured it in heaping, steaming spoonfuls, and went to bed. It was a night of rolling and bucking, and not between the sheets. Like two corpses we lay, straining our ears to make sure that Goose was still tied to the mooring. The wind mocked us all.”

- Claire Antoszewski

“By now, Claire and I had our routine dialed. No other aspect of our life together required the communication or cooperation of managing the boat. Claire was the captain, I the mate. We worked together. We solved our problems—not the kind that send flat-footed couples to therapy, but the kind that require someone on deck and someone aloft, someone to tie in the reef lines and someone to steer the boat head to wind. We relied on each other. I wasn’t ready to sell the horses and buy our dog a life jacket, but the experience further convinced us that we could spend our lives together—on land and sea.”

-Wil Grant

Read the full feature here.
All images © Greta Rybus for Outside Magazine

The New Makers: New England Artists Photographed for Yankee Magazine

“Their skills are as old as New England itself; their materials, timeless. But there’s a modern gleam that run through the work of the 10 artisans in these pages, each pushing the bounds of what’s expected while still keeping that essential connection: hand to hand, theirs to ours.”

Ten New England artist photographed for Yankee Magazine: Forrest Stone, Addie Peet, James and Zoe Zillian, John Welch, Jeremy Frey, Tanya Monique Crane, Linny Kenney, Ruben Marroquin, Moriah Cowles, and Melinda Cox. Written by Annie Graves.

All images © Greta Rybus for Yankee Magazine

Bill Mackowski, one of the last snowshoe makers, for Another Escape

“I’ve been a woodsman my entire life. I’ve hunted and trapped and spent time out in the woods since I was a kid. In the winter, we always had to use snowshoes and pack baskets, and as I got older I took an interest in making my own. I originally started making snowshoes when I was in my late thirties, when I was kind of going through a midlife crisis.There was an old fella here in Maine called Dick McCubrey who made snowshoes – one of the last guys left – and I asked him to make me a pair. He said, “Listen, why don’t I teach you how to make your own?” I said, “Gee, that sounds like a great idea”. From him, I learnt the basics for a pretty standard working snowshoe, and that’s where it all started. 

People tend to overlook the importance of snowshoes for the spread of civilization. They often don’t realize the incredible history and impact snowshoes have had. They go way back to the original expansion of civilization; for so long, travel was restricted to canoes, but the snowshoe opened up areas that were otherwise totally inaccessible. “

Bill Mackowski is considered to be among the last snowshoe makers. He makes snowshoes and pack baskets by hand in his workshop on his farm in Milford, Maine- where he also houses a collection of over 200 snowshoes from around the world in every size, shape, and tradition. Photographed for Another Escape.

All images © Greta Rybus for Another Escape