Photography

Maine's Wild Blueberry Wine for the New York Times


“Wild blueberries are Maine’s bounty, the official state berry and a staple of roadside farm stands in the late summer. They are nutritious, tart, piquant and subtly complex. But there are problems: Because of competition, climate change and low commodity prices, farmers are not making enough money to sustain their businesses.”  

Michael Terrien, who has been making wines in California for over 20 years but grew up in Southern Maine, has returned to Maine with childhood friend Eric Martin, a novelist, to develop and make Bluet, a sparkling Prosecco-style wine made from Maine’s wild blueberries. 

All images © Greta Rybus for the New York Times

The Locals' Guide to Portland, Maine for the Wall Street Journal

“James Beard award-winning restaurants line cobblestone streets, breweries turn out serious suds and the lobster roll is in a constant state of upscale reinvention. Portland, Maine, is a food-lover’s fantasyland, but the culture goes well beyond the plate. Works by Renoir, Homer and Picasso hang at the Portland Museum of Art, and Mother Nature puts on an all-seasons show. Set on the water—the Casco Bay islands make for picturesque day trips—the former capital of the state is rife with trails winding through its parks and promenades. Visitors are prone to mid-hike epiphanies: Why not live here? Soon after novelist Richard Russo and his wife, Barbara, moved to town, daughters Kate and Emily followed. Emily opened PRINT, a bookstore in artsy Munjoy Hill. ‘Our roots in Portland are very deep,’ said Mr. Russo, whose new book, Chances Are… was written there. ‘I can’t think what would get us out of here now.’”

An insider’s guide to Portland, with recommendations by artist Will Sears, chefs Ilma Lopez and Damian Sansonetti, designer Jill McGowan, and writer Richard Russo. Photographed for the Wall Street Journal.

All images © Greta Rybus for the Wall Street Journal

Dylan Stewart, Artist and Spearfisher, Photographed for Another Escape's Water Issue

“I have a fascination with all species in the ocean, although I typically focus on fish in my work because they are such a huge part of my life through spearfishing and cooking. The interactions you have with fish whilst freediving are so unique. I am always humbled by the ease at which they navigate their underwater oases; it doesn’t matter how comfortable I become underwater, or how long I can hold my breath, the species that live there will always make me feel a little foolish. Every time I get in the water I am reminded how important it is that we learn to interact sustainably and in a thoughtful way with our oceans. I see the impacts of climate change and overfishing, and it is saddening to witness the water temperatures rise year on year here in the Gulf of Maine – as they are all around the world – and to see invasive species begin their incursion on our coastline.” 

Dylan Stewart is a pyrography artist and spearfisher based on the rugged, rocky coast of Maine, USA. Most of his days are spent either with a blowtorch in his hand working on woodburning projects or submerged underwater freediving. Under the name Bold Coast Burns, Dylan painstakingly creates detailed works that focus on the marine species he encounters during his time in the water.

All images © Greta Rybus for Another Escape

Athlete Kate Hall for Runner's World

Can an Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Make the Olympic Track Team?

Kate Hall, a jumper and sprinter, wants to be the first American to do so. She’ll get there her way.

“My work ethic stems from being diagnosed [with Type 1 Diabetes] when I was 10,” Kate Hall says. “I’ve had to manage and control this disease from a very young age, and I wanted to do it all on my own.”

Read the full story about Kate Hall, written by Scott Douglas, here.

All images © Greta Rybus for Runner’s World.

Bon Appetit's Andrew Knowlton and Family Explore Maine, Photographed for Maine Office of Tourism

This summer, I got to explore Midcoast Maine with Andrew Knowlton, Restaurant Editor at Bon Appétit magazine and host of Netflix’s The Final Table, and his family for Maine Office of Tourism and Visit Maine’s the Maine Quarterly. Along with his daughters Julep and Signe, and wife Christina, Andrew visited some of his favorite spots along Maine’s coast.

“It starts a few weeks out from Memorial Day and lasts through Labor Day. Maine Recommendation Season is an annual phenomenon in the Knowlton house, as friends (and friends of friends) plot out their perfect getaways to the Pine Tree State. The texts, emails and DMs start rolling in the moment the weather turns: “Hey, hope you’re well! Going up to Maine in a few weeks. I know you love it up there. What should we make sure to hit?” It’s as much a ritual as baseball’s opening day—and something I take just as seriously.”

See Andrew Knowlton’s Maine recommendations here. And his profile of Portland, Maine as Restaurant City of the Year here.

All images © Greta Rybus for Visit Maine

Tracing Family History through Montana

For 163 years, my family had a presence in Montana’s Madison Valley. In the 1860s, my ancestors, William H. Ennis and Myron D. Jeffers and their families settled on either side of the Madison Valley, establishing the towns of Ennis and Jeffers, which still bear their names. Since the ‘80s, my grandmother was the last to live in Ennis, in little home on Main Street between the bank and the library. When we could, my family would join her there for Thanksgivings and 4th of Julys. This year, we returned for the fourth and we did the usual things: went to the pancake breakfast fundraiser at the firehouse and the rodeo, watched the parade from the same spot we always had. But this time, the little house on Main Street was gone, now just an empty square of dirt. My grandmother wasn’t with us — she passed last October — and we celebrated her life at the little church in Jeffers she attended for decades. After the memorial,  I stayed in Montana with my family, and learned more about my family’s history than I’d ever known: about my ancestors who made home in this valley, those they relied on, those they displaced, and the ways people can be connected to a place and to each other. 

All images © Greta Rybus

The Swedish Tradition of Midsommar in Northern Maine, Photographed for Yankee Magazine

Midsommar is a festival of lightness, flowers, warmth, and food. It’s also a celebration of the natural movement of people. People take a lot of pride in the stories of how their greatgrandfathers and great-great-grandmothers wound up living in northern Maine, but there’s also a sense of latent worry. Aroostook County is a place that’s dwindling in population, and it has been for years. For these Mainers, immigration isn’t a problem to be solved. It’s a necessity. 

“We have a saying up here,” he tells me. “If you are not Swedish by genealogy, you can be Swedish by association. Swedishness is a feeling. It’s a feeling of community and comfort and understanding and appreciation.” Really, he says, “it’s just about being welcoming.” It’s a big-hearted sentiment, as sweet as lingonberry jam… but, I’m inclined to believe it. Midsommar is a relic from the past, but perhaps it’s also a symbol of our shared future. 

Text by writer, friend, and collaborator Katy Kelleher. Photographed for Yankee Magazine

© Greta Rybus