climate change

Dylan Stewart, Artist and Spearfisher, Photographed for Another Escape's Water Issue

“I have a fascination with all species in the ocean, although I typically focus on fish in my work because they are such a huge part of my life through spearfishing and cooking. The interactions you have with fish whilst freediving are so unique. I am always humbled by the ease at which they navigate their underwater oases; it doesn’t matter how comfortable I become underwater, or how long I can hold my breath, the species that live there will always make me feel a little foolish. Every time I get in the water I am reminded how important it is that we learn to interact sustainably and in a thoughtful way with our oceans. I see the impacts of climate change and overfishing, and it is saddening to witness the water temperatures rise year on year here in the Gulf of Maine – as they are all around the world – and to see invasive species begin their incursion on our coastline.” 

Dylan Stewart is a pyrography artist and spearfisher based on the rugged, rocky coast of Maine, USA. Most of his days are spent either with a blowtorch in his hand working on woodburning projects or submerged underwater freediving. Under the name Bold Coast Burns, Dylan painstakingly creates detailed works that focus on the marine species he encounters during his time in the water.

All images © Greta Rybus for Another Escape

Climate Change and the Lobster Industry, photographed for the New York Times

"Since the early 1980s, climate change had warmed the Gulf of Maine’s cool waters to the ideal temperature for lobsters, which has helped grow Maine’s fishery fivefold to a half-billion-dollar industry, among the most valuable in the United States. But last year the state’s lobster landings dropped by 22 million pounds, to 111 million.

Now, scientists and some fishermen are worried that the waters might eventually warm too much for the lobsters, and are asking how much longer the boom can last.“Climate change really helped us for the last 20 years,” said Dave Cousens, who stepped down as president of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association in March. But, he added, “Climate change is going to kill us, in probably the next 30.”

Since 2015, my personal work has centered around investigating and documenting how climate change impacts people and communities. I was so pleased to have an assignment with the New York Times to photograph how climate change will shape the lobster industry, with excellent writing and reporting by Livia Allbeck-Ripka. 

Read the article in the New York Times here

All images © Greta Rybus for the New York Times